06
Mar
14

Author Minnie Lahongrais Reviews The Corpse of Madeline Hill

Minnie LahonguerEdward Medina is an Amazon bestselling author and there’s reason for that. His latest short story release, “The Corpse of Madeline Hill” is just one more. He has a natural knack for sucking you into his stories within the first few lines. As a native New Yorker who regularly escaped the city to Poughkeepsie for years, I was immediately drawn in with its first two lines. The second sentence “Everyone knows the story of Sleepy Hollow” gave me a hint as to what was to come.

There are two particular traits in Mr. Medina’s writing style that I love. As anticipated, he did not disappoint me with this tale. One standout trait is the actual writing.

This is a beautifully sad, somewhat strange story told in prose so colorful, so vivid you are transported to your favorite campsite where you find yourself sitting around a fire with your friends transfixed by the orator’s voice as the tale is told.

The second outstanding trait I always look for is the way he inserts mysterious and totally unexpected twists in his stories. Again, there was no dissatisfaction there.

“The Corpse of Madeline Hill” is a quick read but by no means is it so because of lack of passion or wit. This is one of those stories you will want to read again and again, just to see if you missed something.

Kudos Mr. Medina!!!

Native New Yorker Minnie Lahongrais unwittingly kick-started her second career in mid-2010 when she began writing an urban fantasy tale intended to help her cope with the death of her father. November the same year, she set that story aside to immerse herself in the annual madness of NaNoWriMo resulting in her first novel, “Sinner’s Ride,” and published it Spring of 2011. That summer, she began writing “Divergent Lives,” releasing it 12/12/12. She finds time to write every day and is currently working on her third, untitled novel as well as her “Pink Diamond Inspirations” radio talk show on www.allmediaradio.com. For more information follow her on Twitter or her Facebook Author Page

The Corpse of Madeline HillNew York State’s Hudson Valley is fertile ground for specters and legends of all types and lineages. Everyone knows the story of Sleepy Hollow. Not far from the Headless Horseman’s territory, in Ulster County, New York, you’ll find the small town of Accord. You’ll miss it if you drive by too quickly. Accord has one of these stories. Accord has one of these cautionary tales wrapped around a haunting event. A tale that’s meant to remind us that love is eternal, and that evil and hate are real, and both come with death not far behind.

Amazon Bestselling author Edward Medina has found another unique and frightening story to share with you. The art of making wine is the art of capturing time in a bottle. It’s about taking living elements at the glory of their being and causing their demise in the most sublime way possible. The art of making wine is the art of capturing life and death in a bottle. The Corpse of Madeline Hill is a tale of luscious wine, eternal love, brutal murder and savage revenge set in the New York State wine regions. This short story also serves as proof that the best revenge is aged revenge.

“Edward Medina is gifted beyond measure in the art of storytelling. The Corpse of Madeline Hill jumps from the pages and swarms the senses in the best revenge tale I’ve read in years. Amazing.” – Amazon Reader

“Thrilling, terrifying, and romantic. We have all driven down a road in a sleepy town, passed by an open cemetery, and wondered who is buried there. Medina takes us under that ground and digs up the story of Madeline Hill, long forgotten by the town’s inhabitants, and as we soon learn, disastrously so.” – Amazon Reader

The Corpse of Madeline Hill  debuted in the Top Twenty-Five on the Amazon Bestseller list for Short Stories Horror and has earned 9 Amazon and Goodreads ★★★★★ reviews from readers, reviewers, authors, and bloggers. The Corpse of Madeline Hill is available on Amazon.

Edward MedinaEdward Medina is a native New Yorker who was raised by his mother and grandmother to believe that life is an adventure best lived to the fullest. To that end he has lived his life on the edge of creative possibility.

Over time, Edward has been a radio and voice over artist. He built a significant career as a producer, director and writer for both digital media and the New York Off and Off – Off Broadway stages. He also had the honor and the privilege to work for the late great Jim Henson. He then went on to become a theme park designer. For fun, he became a steam train engineer and has been since childhood, a sometime magician. Although, at this point in his life, the magic he creates is more for the page as an author of high fantasy, dark horror, and epic steampunk adventures.

If you’d like more information on Edward’s work, visit his website, follow him on Twitter, like his page on Facebook, and subscribe to his blog on WordPress.

Edward Medina is proud to be a member of the Horror Writers Association and the Society of Children’s Book Writers & Illustrators.

28
Feb
14

The Corpse of Madeline Hill

photo by Eric HahnNew York State’s Hudson Valley is fertile ground for specters and legends of all types and lineages. Everyone knows the story of Sleepy Hollow. Not far from the Headless Horseman’s territory, in Ulster County, New York, you’ll find the small town of Accord. You’ll miss it if you drive by too quickly. Accord has one of these stories. Accord has one of these cautionary tales wrapped around a haunting event. A tale that’s meant to remind us that love is eternal, and that evil and hate are real, and both come with death not far behind.

Follow any of the winding two lane roads that run through Accord and you’ll find an eerily peaceful spot. All roads lead here. No matter which set of turns you take. Ask anyone in town and they’ll all tell you the same thing. They’ll say that all roads lead to Whitfield Cemetery.

Once you arrive you’ll find all the things that would make this a traditionally peaceful spot. Several small groups of trees are scattered about. They cast enough of a shadow to add a proper air of respectful solemnity to the surroundings. No walls nor any fence or gate encircles it. Whatever unrest exists here is free to come and go at its pleasure.

Seven hundred and fifty-seven souls call Whitfield Cemetery home. Revolutionary and Civil War veterans reside there. As do doctors, lawyers, teachers, farmers, carpenters, housewives, husbands, children and infants. Some lead exemplary lives, others not so much, and some didn’t have time enough for either. You’ll find generations of local families buried here. Whitfield Cemetery is also the place where you’ll find the corpse of Madeline Hill.

This distinguished lady was laid to rest, if you could call it that, in the lone grave at the top of the small hill on the far side of the cemetery. Everyone calls the hill Madeline Hill, but no one really remembers why. Over time everyone just came to assume that the hill itself was named after some woman. At one point there were so many different versions of her tale that everyone was confused. Or perhaps they had been misdirected by the still living will of the woman buried in the hill. Then one day, no one really knows when, the citizens of Accord all just forgot to tell each other the story anymore.

It was once widely believed that if you put your ear to the ground at Mistress Madeline’s grave you’d hear the beating of her heart down below. If you were brave enough to do it. Deadly things happen at this particular grave. The last set of citizens who whispered about that fact, are buried on the other side of this particular graveyard.

Whitfield Cemetery has had many caretakers. None of them stay very long. One of those anonymous many wanted a small souvenir of the well known resting place he cared for before he left for good. He took a hammer and chisel to her tombstone. All he wanted was a chip. No one was sure what happened next but he was found with the chisel buried in the back of his skull. The chisel wasn’t what killed him. Apparently he had been stung to death by a swarm of mosquitoes first. The chisel came after.

Father Curran drove all the way up from New York City after having heard the story of Madeline Hill. He brought a bottle of sacramental wine to forgive Madeline her sins and consecrate her resting place in order to bring her peace. But this is a place of neither rest nor peace. As he uncorked the bottle the glass shattered. Both his wrists were sliced open. He bled to death right on the spot, with his body laying six feet above the unforgiving mistress below.

The last time anyone tried to disturb her grave was in 1962 when the Felix brothers made their foolish attempt. As the shovel pierced the ground above her corpse, one brother had a massive heart attack that killed him instantly. The other brother tripped over his own feet as he ran for help. He struck his head on her tombstone, and snapped his neck. The Felix brothers had heard the tale that Madeline had been buried with a rather rare and unique bottle of spirits and that simple found fact lead to their deaths.

Stories are powerful. The ones that come with a warning are most important. The story of Madeline Hill has faded away. People have forgotten about it. This is most unfortunate. It’s rather frightening actually because stories like this one should never be forgotten.

The Corpse of Madeline HillAmazon Bestselling author Edward Medina has found another unique and frightening story to share with you. The art of making wine is the art of capturing time in a bottle. It’s about taking living elements at the glory of their being and causing their demise in the most sublime way possible. The art of making wine is the art of capturing life and death in a bottle. The Corpse of Madeline Hill is a tale of luscious wine, eternal love, brutal murder and savage revenge set in the New York State wine regions. This short story also serves as proof that the best revenge is aged revenge.

“Edward Medina is gifted beyond measure in the art of storytelling. The Corpse of Madeline Hill jumps from the pages and swarms the senses in the best revenge tale I’ve read in years. Amazing.” – Amazon Reader

“This is a beautifully sad, somewhat strange story told in prose so colorful, so vivid, you are transported to your favorite campsite where you find yourself sitting around a fire with your friends transfixed by the orator’s voice as the tale is told.” – Author, Minnie Lahongrais 

The Corpse of Madeline Hill debuted in the Top Twenty-Five on the Amazon Bestseller list for Short Stories Horror and has earned 9 Amazon and Goodreads ★★★★★ reviews from readers, reviewers, authors, and bloggers. The Corpse of Madeline Hill is available on Amazon.

Edward MedinaEdward Medina is a native New Yorker who was raised by his mother and grandmother to believe that life is an adventure best lived to the fullest. To that end he has lived his life on the edge of creative possibility.

Over time, Edward has been a radio and voice over artist. He built a significant career as a producer, director and writer for both digital media and the New York Off and Off – Off Broadway stages. He also had the honor and the privilege to work for the late great Jim Henson. He then went on to become a theme park designer. For fun, he became a steam train engineer and has been since childhood, a sometime magician. Although, at this point in his life, the magic he creates is more for the page as an author of high fantasy, dark horror, and epic steampunk adventures.

If you’d like more information on Edward’s work, visit his website, follow him on Twitter, like his page on Facebook, and subscribe to his blog on WordPress.

Edward Medina is proud to be a member of the Horror Writers Association and the Society of Children’s Book Writers & Illustrators.

20
Nov
13

The Conversation

The Conversation

I’m the type of writer that likes a challenge especially if it comes with a bit of a risk.

For The Conversation I set myself about the task of writing a short story that would consist of nothing but dialogue. The challenge was to create an entire world, a room in it, two characters at odds with each other, and have the reader come along for the ride as their imagination filled in the details.

The risk being that this story was for an anthology submission. An anthology submission for a publishing company with a fine reputation. Submitting a story without traditional narrative, in my opinion, was a bold move. I accepted the challenge because if it worked out the submission would stand out. I took the risk because I wanted my work in the proposed book. And really… what is life without some risk?

In this story I never say exactly where we are. The reader creates that. I never reveal the gender of either of the people chatting away in this place. The reader decides that. I also had the control of not telling you everything that was in the room until the very moment I wanted you to know. That made the built in scares more sneaky and intimate.

When the story was completed I handed it over to a high school teacher in Syracuse, New York. She in turn presented it to three classes of her students. They took turns playing the parts in all sorts of combinations. They laughed at the funny parts and jumped at the creepy parts. What more could a horror writer ask for?

I submitted my creation to Angelic Knight Press and they accepted it for inclusion in Satan’s Toybox: Terrifying Teddies which was being edited by the fabulous Stacey Turner. Just over a year after it’s publication I remain proud to be a part of this wonderful book. It’s a fine collection of spooky, touching, and funny tales by some very talented writers who have the kind of twisted imaginations I can roll with.

As always, I’d like to thank the fine folks at Angelic Knight Press for being a class act to work with, for recognizing writing in all its fun forms, and for including my short in this clever and very creepy anthology about the cuddly pieces of plush that have found a place in all our hearts and homes.

In celebration of the anniversary, and with permission from the publisher, I present to you… The Conversation. In its entirety. I hope you enjoy… ;-)

THE CONVERSATION

What am I looking at?

A teddy bear.

A what?

A teddy bear.

I know that. I’m asking why, am I looking at a teddy bear?

It’s how we’re going to get this done.

With a teddy bear?

Yeah.

These things were banned a hundred years ago.

Yeah. Watch your language.

You’re right. Sorry. Purged.

Yes. They were.

So we’re going to use a purged entertainment to do this?

Yeah.

The powers that be will never go for it.

Why were they purged?

Because an adorable entertainment can make us look bad.

Exactly.

Are you insane?

Not yet.

We shouldn’t even be having this conversation.

I know.

Things are purged for a reason.

I know.

The messages they deliver are a force for good.

Yeah.

What’s next?

Next?

Cartoons? Puppets?

No. I told you. I’m not insane.

But the messages?

We can control those.

Control them?

Yes.

It’s cute.

I know.

I’m getting hopeful just standing next to it.

I know.

How do you control that?

It’ll talk.

What?

It will talk.

Oh my God.

No using the Lord’s name in vain.

Sorry. Great.

What?

Now I’m in violation of the third directive.

It’s okay. We’re alone.

Why would we make it talk?

So it can say wonderful things.

Stop.

Things that make one feel better about themselves.

Please stop.

Things that make one think that we’re not in control of what they think.

It doesn’t sound that way to me, at all.

That’s my point.

It is?

Our message is not on the surface.

Yeah. I see that.

Our message is between the lines.

Between the lines?

In the subliminal frequencies.

Interesting.

Our message is in what you don’t hear.

Go on.

On the surface it speaks of hope.

Yes. The ridiculous. I understand that.

In between all that pabulum it’ll send a message directly to the brain.

Our message.

Yes.

Our agenda.

Good. You’re getting it.

And how does that take care of our problem?

By eliminating it at the source.

The source?

Children.

Children will never fall for it.

Not our children. They have educations.

But their children will.

Exactly.

They’re desperate for any sign of hope.

Exactly.

How does this subliminal message translate into action?

The children will kill themselves.

I like that.

I knew that you would.

Killing unbelievers is always a good thing.

I thought you’d say that.

But, eliminating them at the source?

Yes?

That’s genius.

I was hoping you’d say that.

So how does it work?

The child talks to the bear. The bear talks back.

I get that.

An implanted chip and some mechanics will make that work.

But of course.

We use the same messages we use in our media.

Really?

Yes. Why?

Those messages are not subliminal, at all.

They’re blatant, actually.

Be careful what you say.

I told you, we’re alone here.

Blatant or not our message is strong, unified and clear.

Yes. That’s the party line.

You don’t agree?

We both know they’re starting to tune it out.

I might be inclined to agree.

The ones who ignore our message and go about their lives are not our problem.

No. We’ll come for those later.

True. Our problem is the troublemakers now.

The resisters.

Exactly.

The protestors.

Yes.

The anarchists.

Yes.

And we’ll strike at them where they’re most vulnerable.

Yes. We kill their children.

With the same messages.

Only this time they’ll be directly implanted in their brains through a teddy bear.

If I wasn’t so paranoid, I’d laugh out loud right now.

We’ll fill them with doubt.

Good.

Add a healthy dose of lack of self worth.

Nice touch.

And a total disbelief in their belief systems.

Do they have belief systems at such a young age?

They have the beliefs of their parents.

This thing could destroy their families from within.

Icing on the cake.

Rather tasty icing, to boot.

Some children will turn on their families.

Excellent.

Some children will turn to us.

All are welcome.

Well, not all. Really.

Of course not.

I’ve often wondered about that.

About what?

Why not accept everyone as long as they believe in what we believe?

Because not everyone is, right.

Don’t you mean acceptable?

What?

Because not everyone is acceptable.

Alone or not you’re about to cross a line.

I’m trying hard not to.

Everyone has a purpose.

Yes.

Some will go to homes.

Of course.

Others will go to work camps.

Someone has to drive our economy.

And why is that?

So the rest of us can enjoy it.

See. You’re still very much a believer.

I guess I am.

Good. How will the children die?

The negative barrage will lead to acute depression.

There’s a pill for that.

They have no access to medical care.

So you’re predicting?

With just the right final message.

Yes?

Suicides. On an epic scale.

I really like this.

I’m glad it’s growing on you.

But it’s missing something.

You think it’s dull on the surface?

It does lack pizzazz.

No spark?

It doesn’t have flash, that’s for sure.

Funny you should say that.

What’s this?

It’s a microchip.

I know it’s a microchip.

You’re asking why, are you holding a microchip?

Yes.

Because it’s the latest in micro incendiary technology.

I’m holding an explosive.

Yes.

Jesus Christ.

Language.

Fuck.

Don’t worry. It’s not active.

Take this from me.

It’s not active until I put it in the bear.

Just take it already.

Feel better?

Yes.

Would you like to see how this works?

It explodes. It kills people. I get it.

No. I meant with the bear.

It explodes. It kills people. I really do get it.

Touch the bear’s eyes.

You want me to touch it?

Yes. The eyes.

I will do no such thing.

Touch the left one first. Then the right one.

Why am I doing this?

You’ll see. Now back to the left one for two touches.

They feel very real.

They’re made from a new form of dense silicone gel.

Oh goody.

Now, tweak the nose.

What?

Tweak the teddy bears nose.

I will not.

Just do it.

Well look at that.

Told you that it was something to see.

It’s very disturbing. The way its head pops open.

You get used to it.

What is all that?

A lot of very expensive hardware.

Not that. The pink parts.

That’s brain tissue.

A child’s brain?

No. What kind of question is that?

You’re showing. I’m asking.

You’re making me out to be some kind of monster.

I apologize.

Apology accepted.

Where’d the brain matter come from?

Remember the zoos?

They were purged seventy five years ago.

Why were they purged?

So that people wouldn’t identify with the plight of animals.

What happened to all the animals?

They were relocated to their natural habitats.

What really happened to the animals?

They were all destroyed.

Not all of them.

Not all of them?

No.

Why not?

Some were destroyed. Others were kept.

Why were they kept?

For experimentation.

I see.

You’re looking at brain tissue from a bear.

An actual bear?

Yes, but not just any bear.

Of course not.

It’s from a North American brown bear.

Not very exciting.

It’s the brain tissue of a grizzly bear.

A grizzly?

Yes. The last known grizzly in existence.

Really?

So I was told.

What are you doing with the chip?

I’m placing it in the trigger chamber.

Is that wise?

It’s necessary.

It sounds foolish.

I’d like to show you how the targeting system functions.

The targeting system?

Yes.

This thing doesn’t just explode?

Nope.

It targets too?

Oh yes.

Nice touch.

Thank you.

Equally disturbing.

What?

The way the head snaps shut.

The sound doesn’t help.

It’s like a little scream.

They’re just gears.

Why’s it staring at me, now?

You noticed that?

How could I not?

Take a step.

What?

Left or right.

I’m having trouble moving.

Come on. Either direction.

The eyes are following me.

They’re targeting you.

What?

The eyes direct the force of the explosion.

It sees?

The bear sees its target, yes.

It’s looking right at me.

The size of the explosion can be controlled.

It’s staring at me.

We could take out a child asleep in their room.

Make it stop.

We could take out a whole city block.

Hey.

What?

Make it stop staring at me.

You need to relax.

I need you to make it stop.

Relax. We’re safe here.

You’re safe.

We both are.

It’s not looking at you.

Actually it’s watching us both.

That did not help.

You look thirsty.

Thirsty?

You look like you could use a drink.

Sure. Make mine a double.

Ask the bear.

I am not talking to that thing.

Of course not.

Exactly.

You can’t talk to the bear.

I don’t want to talk to the bear.

The vocal mechanics and software haven’t been installed yet.

Well, aren’t I the lucky one.

You just have to think it.

What did you just say?

Just think your request for a drink.

It’s in my head now?

Once it targets, it keys in on brain waves.

It knows what I’m thinking?

Ever since it laid eyes on you.

And you.

Yes. Both of us.

That’s not right.

It has to be in the victim’s head to deliver the messages.

No. Not that.

Then what?

The bear is moving.

Of course it is.

That’s not right.

It’s getting you your drink.

It’s able to walk.

Oh yes.

That pitcher is twice its size.

The bear is very strong.

And it didn’t spill a drop.

Another benefit of accurate targeting.

What’s it waiting for?

It’s waiting for you to take a drink.

I have to satisfy it?

No.

Well that’s good.

You have to reassure it.

No. I don’t.

It’s what a child would do.

I am not a child.

Just do it.

There. Are you satisfied?

The bear is.

I don’t care about the bear.

Thank you.

You’re not welcome.

I was talking to the bear.

Are we done here?

Not just yet.

What more is there?

There’s one more thing.

Just one?

Just one.

What the hell. Let me have it.

It’s a final solution of sorts.

I’m listening.

Some children are pig headed.

I’m sure your mother said that of you.

And I’m sure your mother was much more anal than mine.

Touché.

My point is, systems could fail.

The messages might not get delivered.

Exactly.

The bomb might not go off.

Exactly.

So what’s the solution?

Hand to hand combat.

The bear is capable of assault?

It’s like a little furry assassin.

Ok. That’s nifty.

Nifty?

You know what I mean.

It’s okay. I think it’s nifty too.

What’s that?

You mean why is there a sleeping baby here?

No. I mean how did you get your hands on a baby?

I found it.

You found it?

It was abandoned.

Abandoned where?

In a middle poor district.

And what were you doing there?

Looking for abandoned babies.

Babies? Plural?

Oh yes.

How many?

Oh, we’ve been through dozens, perfecting this mode.

Dozens?

Several dozen.

Where do you keep them?

Keep them?

Yes.

There’s no need to keep them.

There isn’t?

No.

Well that’s good.

We just dispose of the bodies when we’re done.

Keeping an eye on the taxpayer dollar.

Always.

Nicely done.

See that scalpel over there.

Which one?

The longest one.

Yes.

Give it to the bear.

You’re joking.

No. Not at all.

You give it to the bear.

I have to place the baby closer to the bear.

Why is this thing reaching out to me?

The bear wants the scalpel.

It wants it?

Just give it to the bear already.

It’s got quite a grip on it.

Let go of the scalpel before the bear tears your arm off.

Could it really do that?

Very easily.

Impressive.

Put these safety glasses on.

Why?

Because this is going to get messy.

What about my clothes?

Believe me, there’s nothing remarkable about your clothes.

You really should be nicer to me.

Now, will the bear to kill the baby.

What?

You heard me.

That doesn’t make any sense.

Why not?

What’s to prevent a child from willing this thing to kill?

Only a controller can order the bear to kill.

A controller?

Yes. The people monitoring the activities of the bears.

So we will have some control?

That’s the plan.

How does the bear recognize a controller?

Each controller will be imbedded with a chip.

I wasn’t imbedded with a chip.

Yes, you were.

No. I wasn’t.

When you swallowed the water.

What?

There was a nano chip at the bottom of the glass.

Why would you do that to me?

Because sometimes you can be a pain in the ass.

Only about anything different.

My point exactly.

How many controllers are there?

At the moment?

Yes.

Just, you and I.

Very exclusive club.

It’s for control purposes.

Understandable.

Until we work out all the kinks.

Kinks?

Well, it is a very sophisticated bear.

True.

There are many things that could still go wrong.

You’re not reassuring me.

You worry too much.

It’s my job to worry.

What worries you?

I’m worried this could all go horribly wrong.

Not possible.

Says you.

Yes, says I.

You’ve created quite the Frankenbear, doctor.

Thank you. Now will the bear to kill the baby.

Just think it?

Yes.

Any particular way?

Well the bear does have a scalpel.

Of course.

Will it.

I am.

Think it.

I’m thinking.

Think about that blade plunging into that sleeping baby.

That’s exactly what I’m thinking.

Think about how much you hate them.

I do hate them.

Think about how much you hate their babies.

They need to die.

Why isn’t the bear responding?

I don’t know. You built the thing.

Think harder.

I am.

Think fast. The baby’s waking up.

Will that affect the demonstration?

It’ll make it messier.

Great.

Are you sure you’re focused on killing that baby?

Nobody wants that baby deader than I do.

Something’s wrong.

I should say so.

It’s never failed before.

These things happen.

Not at this stage.

That’s why it’s called research and development.

I guess.

What are you doing to the baby?

Down the incinerator chute it goes.

But it’s still usable.

Well, I’m pissed and I can’t take it out on the bear.

True. Still a waste of valuable tissue.

Bill me.

Hey.

What?

You did a good job here.

I’ll fix it.

I know.

It’ll be perfect.

What’s it’s called?

Called?

Yes. What do their children call it?

Oh. Taylor Teddy.

Sounds like a female’s name.

This bear is a female.

See. You are insane.

I don’t think so.

You’re attaching human attributes to an inanimate object.

So?

So that makes you certifiable.

You really think so?

Yes.

Please don’t tell anyone.

I won’t.

Thank you.

Just don’t say it out loud ever again.

I won’t.

Excellent choice.

You’re a good person.

Good has nothing to do with it.

Of course not.

Now, when will this be ready to present?

Soon. Very soon.

And the prototypes?

They’ll be destroyed in favor of the final design.

Another excellent decision.

I’m glad that you approve.

Back to work with you then.

You know, my research did find something interesting.

Research?

Yes. On the history of teddy bears.

You’ve been doing research?

Yes.

There is never a need for the confusion of research.

Well, of course.

Burn it.

What? The bear?

No. The research.

Of course.

What did this research show?

At the time, some people believed that these bears were alive.

Alive?

To a degree.

A ridiculous degree.

They believed the bears had a consciousness

What?

A mission.

What kind of mission?

They believed the bears protected them from harm.

Stop calling it a bear.

What if our energy imbues it with free will?

It’s not real. It’s not a bear. It’s a thing.

Is it?

What the hell is wrong with you?

I’m just asking a question.

Well, stop it.

Why?

Because nothing good ever came from asking questions.

Is that really true?

Talk like that will get us tortured and shot.

Lower your voice then.

I thought you said we were alone in here.

We are.

Then who just turned off the lights?

Satan's Toybox Terrifying TeddiesSatan’s Toybox has escaped from Hell. In our world, vengeance is unleashed. This time around it’s everyone’s favorite toy. Ever wonder what’s beyond the huggable exterior and button eyes of your beloved Teddy Bear?

Fourteen authors share their stories …

Phil Hickes, Adam Millard, Donald Jacob Uitvlugt, Steven Gepp, Edward Medina, Lisamarie Lamb, Lisa McCourt Hollar, J.G. Williams, Delphine Boswell, Blaise Torrance, Joe Mogel, Rob Miller, Stacey Turner, Blaze McRob

Included in this anthology are tales of a Toy Shoppe where the proprietor might not be quite human, a costume you don’t want to wear, fierce bears who defend what’s theirs, and small children who aren’t exactly what they seem. You’ll never look at Teddy Bears quite the same way after this.

Satan’s Toybox: Terrifying Teddies is available on Amazon and Smashwords .

Alice Author PicAmazon bestselling author Edward Medina is a native New Yorker who was raised by his mother and grandmother to believe that life is an adventure best lived to the fullest. To that end he has lived his life on the edge of creative possibility.

Over time, Edward has been a radio and voice over artist. He built a significant career as a producer, director and writer for both digital media and the New York Off and Off – Off Broadway stages. He also had the honor and the privilege to work for the late great Jim Henson. He then went on to become a theme park designer. For fun, he became a steam train engineer and has been since childhood, a sometime magician. Although, at this point in his life, the magic he creates is more for the page as an author of high fantasy, dark horror, and epic steampunk adventures.

If you’d like more information on Edward’s work, visit his website, follow him on Twitter, like his page on Facebook, and subscribe to his blog on WordPress.

Edward Medina is proud to be a member of the Horror Writers Association and the Society of Children’s Book Writers & Illustrators.

09
Nov
13

Author Claudette Marco Interviews Edward Medina

Claudette MarcoBestselling author Edward Medina captures the beauty of writing and the limitless possibilities of the imagination in his popular novels, plays, and short stories. His books, full of excitement, thrill, and intrigue, are Amazon bestsellers in three categories: Fantasy, Action Adventure, and Horror. He has also written, produced, and directed New York Off and Off-Off Broadway plays, has had the honor of working for the iconic Jim Henson, and has even been a radio and voice over artist. He introduces us to his latest project: Four Days with Edgar A. Poe—A 19th Century Mystery, A 21st Century Crime. In this play for the New York Off-Broadway stage, Medina explores the life and legacy of one of the greatest American authors, Edgar Allan Poe. With wisdom and flair, Medina also describes what being a writer means to him in an interview for the reader, the writer, and the visionary.

CM: Tell us about how you began writing.

EM: Writing has always been with me. As a child I would cut out pictures from magazines, paste them onto construction paper, and write in descriptions next to them. I would write dialogue and put the lines in word balloons by the peoples and animals faces. When I think back I was always writing down stories and story ideas. When I was ten years old I wrote a story about a penny that escaped from the U.S. Mint. I bought little blank booklets, hand wrote copies of my story, and sold them to my friends for a penny. I was a little independent author very early on.

I was, and still am, a voracious reader. Another sign of a writer in the making. I also have a love of music, movies, and all things theatrical. Those are all forms of storytelling. Music taught me that the rhythm of the tale is important. From film I learned structure drives the plot. Theatre always reminds me that there’s an audience out there in the dark. I like to tell good stories. The story, the rhythm, the structure, and the effect words have on a reader are everything. I like stories with twists throughout. I enjoy taking my readers along for a grand adventure.

CM: Your books have very interesting premises! It Is Said, the first book in the Mathias Bootmaker and the Keepers of the Sandbox trilogy, is a dark fantasy, steampunk adventure with a lot of mystery. A Murder of Crows, Adventures of the X Pirates, is also a dark fantasy, steampunk adventure that gives the reader a unique look into the pirate legends. Were you always a fan of steampunk?

EM: Ever since I was a child reading Jules Verne. Steampunk as a movement is still a relatively new and beautiful thing but its pedigree is long, deep and rich. I’m drawn to the style and feel of the genre. I’m drawn to the inventors and inventions of that world. Then there’s the romance of it all and the true desire for optimism to triumph over pessimism. Good steampunk is full of big adventure and epic heroes.

My books have the steampunk flavor but they exist outside of the traditional settings. It Is Said is set in a world of high fantasy in the moment just before the release of the big bang. It explores science, imagination, creativity and tells us how everything we know in the universe came to be. A Murder of Crows is set in a world entirely populated with animals. Not a human being in sight. And yet they’re there. Those animals behave like we do and it’s not always pretty. I figured if it was good enough for George Orwell then it’s good enough for me.

CM: You also delve into other genres with your short stories. Awilda is an urban paranormal story about a huntress of a unique type of vampire. The public tends to categorize authors into one genre and associates any book that that author releases into that genre. But more and more authors are releasing works in various genres. Do you feel that the public is changing its views on this?

EM: I think it’s more a case of author’s changing their views. Independence means creative freedom. There is no box to keep writers in anymore. Good stories come in many forms and cross every genre. Writers should feel free to explore. If there’s a genre that drives you then follow that path. If you wake up one morning with a great story in mind, but it doesn’t fit in your norm, then step off the path for a bit and write away.

There are many traditionally published authors who do just that all the time. Two of my favorites, King and Poe, do just that. Stephen King is known for horror but not all his work fits neatly in that category. Some of his works are just wonderfully deep character studies and if you think you know King and haven’t read his YA book Dragon’s Eyes then you have quite the surprise coming. As for Poe, the man originated several genres all on his own throughout his career. I really don’t think he was consciously doing it. He was just writing what he wanted to write. What he needed to write. We should all do that. It would make the world a much more interesting place.

CM: You write, direct, and produce off- and off-off Broadway plays. How different is it writing plays to writing novels? Do you find that you favor writing one over the other?

EM: One would think that plays are easier. All dialogue. Some would think novels are easier. You have all that room for narrative. Others would think it’s the opposite for both. Too much dialogue. Too much narrative. My thing is the story is all that matters. If it’s a good story it can be told in many ways.

I have a very good friend in the music business. He’s had quite the amazing career. He told me his secret to finding a great song was to find one that sounded amazing fully produced but also sounded equally amazing being played on one instrument and unplugged. To him that was the difference between a hit song and a classic.

A good story should flourish with great narrative but it should also sing if it’s reduced down to the whisper of a private conversation. I love doing both.

4 Days CM: You have announced that you are writing a play for Off Broadway called Four Days with Edgar A. Poe—A 19th Century Mystery, A 21st Century Crime. A big fan of Edgar Allan Poe myself, tell us why you decided to take on this challenge.

EM: Poe fascinates me. Mysteries fascinate me. For as long as I can remember I have loved his work. Then I started learning about the man, the woman in his life, and the way the world, and time, had created and rose to the level of myth, the circumstances of his life. About a year ago I came across an article containing the last words of famous figures in history. Edgar’s was there. I realized I had not a clue of how he died. There were four mysterious days that no one can account for that played a role in taking the life of a brilliant and tortured genius.

The challenge was how does one tell a story about an incident that has no record of occurrence. My solution was to create a story with a contemporary mystery that has its roots in what may or may not have happened during those four days so long ago. I can use his stories and words to paint a picture of his life as it’s reflected in the life of another. I can use a modern day crime to explore what drives a person to madness and heartbreak.

Poe’s last words were “Lord help my poor soul!” Or was it, as some have reported, one word, “Reynolds!’ Or was it misunderstood. Was it really, “Renounced!” Like I said, I love a good mystery.

CM: As a bestselling author and a kind-hearted person, you are someone to look up to. Do you have any advice for writers out there just starting?

EM: Read. Write. Create. Dream. Always be open to learning. Don’t be afraid. Find a story you love. Stick with it. Finish it. Edit. Edit. Edit. Now that it’s really finished get it out there. Buck the system. Be a proud independent author. Find your audience. Help them find your work. Respect their support. Support your fellow authors because we are most assuredly all in this together. Then repeat it all again with your next story, and the next, and the next. And remember to enjoy your life while you do it.

I thank you for those kind words you said about me. I’m far from perfect and I prefer that people look each other in the eye. I’m here in New York, and out there with my stories, slugging it out like other hard working creative types. I really try to conduct myself in the way I was raised by my mother and my grandmother. Be fair. Care about other people. Believe that different is good and special. Try and help when you can and sometimes when you can’t. Work hard and be true to who you are no matter what. It took me a long time to become the person I am. It took me a long time to put together everything they taught me. I’m pretty happy with the way I turned out, and if that makes other people happy then I say join the party, the more the merrier.

CM: How do you picture yourself in the future?

EM: In a boat, on a river, with tangerine trees, and marmalade skies. ;-)

Alice Author PicAmazon bestselling author Edward Medina is a native New Yorker who was raised by his mother and grandmother to believe that life is an adventure best lived to the fullest. To that end he has lived his life on the edge of creative possibility.

Over time, Edward has been a radio and voice over artist. He built a significant career as a producer, director and writer for both digital media and the New York Off and Off – Off Broadway stages. He also had the honor and the privilege to work for the late great Jim Henson. He then went on to become a theme park designer. For fun, he became a steam train engineer and has been since childhood, a sometime magician. Although, at this point in his life, the magic he creates is more for the page as an author of high fantasy, dark horror, and epic steampunk adventures.

If you’d like more information on Edward’s work, visit his website, follow him on Twitter, like his page on Facebook, and subscribe to his blog on WordPress.

Edward Medina is proud to be a member of the Horror Writers Association and the Society of Children’s Book Writers & Illustrators.

This interview first appeared on www.claudettemarco.com. For more information on Claudette Marco please visit her site and follow her on twitter.

09
Nov
13

77WABC NYC – Laura Smith Interviews Edward Medina

77WABC Laura SmithI had the great joy of being interviewed by Laura Smith on New York City’s legendary radio station 77WABC for her show “The Saturday Cafe with Laura Smith”.

We talked indie publishing, steampunk, writing, theatre, and Edgar Allan Poe. Not too shabby. Laura was poised, professional, elegant, charming and funny. Don’t get me started on her smooth as velvet voice. Needless to say I was thrilled to be there. I hadn’t been in front of a live mic since my college radio days at WBAU where I had my own show. Laura and her team made me feel welcomed and comfortable. The questions were spot on and the conversation was a blast. I would be on her show again in a heartbeat.

Click on the file below to listen to the entire interview. I hope you enjoy! ;-)

“The Saturday Cafe with Laura Smith” airs 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm on 77WABC Radio and streams live on WABCRADIO.com

Alice Author PicAmazon bestselling author Edward Medina is a native New Yorker who was raised by his mother and grandmother to believe that life is an adventure best lived to the fullest. To that end he has lived his life on the edge of creative possibility.

Over time, Edward has been a radio and voice over artist. He built a significant career as a producer, director and writer for both digital media and the New York Off and Off – Off Broadway stages. He also had the honor and the privilege to work for the late great Jim Henson. He then went on to become a theme park designer. For fun, he became a steam train engineer and has been since childhood, a sometime magician. Although, at this point in his life, the magic he creates is more for the page as an author of high fantasy, dark horror, and epic steampunk adventures.

If you’d like more information on Edward’s work, visit his website, follow him on Twitter, like his page on Facebook, and subscribe to his blog on WordPress.

Edward Medina is proud to be a member of the Horror Writers Association and the Society of Children’s Book Writers & Illustrators.

17
Jun
13

Poet And Blogger Lucinda Rose Reviews Awilda

Lucinda Rose
Where other author’s promise something sexy, and delicious, then leave their readers wanting… Edward Medina delivers.

Edward Medina, author of It is Said and Murder of Crows, has taken his storytelling to a new level. It is also a move away from the youth adult genre, but then again Medina has never been comfortable with being labeled, according to his published interviews. His style has always been smooth and polished, but this latest work is so smooth it is intoxicating. I couldn’t put it down, and have read it twice, since that bittersweet first night I encountered Awilda. I can understand why Medina couldn’t let go off her. I hated leaving her.

Medina’s command of language and vocabulary weaves a seamless tale. He describes her as “a demure young lady of twenty-six…, with an indefatigable mind in a myriad of places. She was very pretty. Not too thin. Not too heavy. She was a bit on the tall side with lots of leg. Her flesh was creamy white with light pink tones. The vampires loved her for all those lovely attributes.” Readers will also be drawn to her for those reasons as well as the way Medina brings her to life.

The tale is a journey through the mind of an incredibly dedicated vampire hunter specializing in a distinct type of vampires. A type of succubus, or so the story implies, whose favorite meal is a succulent virgin.

Her day job as a librarian leaves her nights free to perfect her skills, while using the books she cares for to help her strengthen her mind and develop strategies. I loved that detail after having worked in a library for six years. Librarians like teachers are creatures whom the general public are intensely interested in, and much time is given over to speculation about private lives. Students like to think that their teachers have no lives and live in school. Yet, they know that they must have a life outside the classroom. So they fantasize about it. Awilda gives a peek into that secret life beyond the cardigans and pencil skirts.

Awilda is no ordinary hunter having killed her first vampire at six. Her second when she was just thirteen. Buffy the Vampire Slayer has nothing on Awilda, who is patient, and disciplined, as well as gifted with a sixth sense when it comes to dispatching the undead. Proud of her kills she maps them to help her end the vampiric infestation.

Medina uses his knowledge of the Big Apple to create a rich urban story that doesn’t play to the usual notes, where everything urban is about thugs, and gangs, or the uber-rich and polished. Awilda is a sophisticated tale in its layers which delicately unfold in this short-story. I wish it had been longer, but like every word Medina uses I am sure there is a reason… one that will delight and entrance in future Awilda stories.

It would be a cliché to say that nothing is what is seems, but there is a twist to this delicious tale making the ending truly amazing, and one which I solemnly swear not to reveal. Independent authors like Medina need readers to support their work, and this project, as well as his others, genuinely deserves it. You can read more of my reviews at Rosereads

Awilda2

This short story from Amazon bestselling author Edward Medina was originally intended for an anthology submission. But Edward fell in love with Awilda, and decided to keep her all to himself. Now it’s time for him to share her with you.

The story of Awilda is an urban paranormal trip through the mind of a dedicated hunter. A hunter specifically designed to kill a very particular form of vampire. Believing it to be her mission since birth, Awilda puts a meticulously planned set of events in motion in order to eradicate the world of this infestation. Good girl by day, holy terror by night, Awilda is not the type of woman you’ll soon forget.

Awilda has charmed her way to number 2 on the Amazon bestseller list for Short Stories Horror and has earned 13 Amazon and Goodreads ★★★★★ reviews from readers, reviewers, authors, and bloggers. Awilda is available on Amazon and is intended for mature readers.

Alice Author PicAmazon bestselling author Edward Medina is a native New Yorker who was raised by his mother and grandmother to believe that life is an adventure best lived to the fullest. To that end he has lived his life on the edge of creative possibility.

Over time, Edward has been a radio and voice over artist. He built a significant career as a producer, director and writer for both digital media and the New York Off and Off – Off Broadway stages. He also had the honor and the privilege to work for the late great Jim Henson. He then went on to become a theme park designer. For fun, he became a steam train engineer and has been since childhood, a sometime magician. Although, at this point in his life, the magic he creates is more for the page as an author of high fantasy, dark horror, and epic steampunk adventures.

If you’d like more information on Edward’s work, visit his website, follow him on Twitter, like his page on Facebook, and subscribe to his blog on WordPress.

Edward Medina is proud to be a member of the Horror Writers Association and the Society of Children’s Book Writers & Illustrators.

12
Jun
13

Awilda

Awilda Lips

Awilda made an observation last night that made her laugh out loud on the subway. Chicken in a can shouldn’t come in liquid. It’s just wrong. We accept it with tuna. Fish are meant to be in liquid. Chickens are air breathers. Awilda often had thoughts like that. Quick random shots through the dark that made her laugh out loud, or cry quite a lot. She liked to laugh. She didn’t like the crying at all. The laughing helped her forget the dark things. The crying reminded her that the laughing was a lie.

Awilda killed her first vampire when she was six years old. He was a child just like she was. He attacked her and she stabbed him in the heart. Just like that. Nice and easy. She was young, but she knew exactly what he was. She had seen the movies. She knew Bela Lugosi when she saw him. So Awilda killed him and buried his body in the abandoned building where it happened.

There were questions. There were police and an investigation. The boy was a friend, of a friend, of a friend, so no one really talked to her about the incident. They couldn’t find him for a long time and then the questions stopped. They never found the body. Just a few years ago the building was demolished. They built a church on that spot. Awilda laughed a lot when she heard they had done that.

Awilda was a demure young lady of twenty-six now, with an indefatigable mind in a myriad of places. She was very pretty. Not too thin. Not too heavy. She was a bit on the tall side with lots of leg. Her flesh was creamy white with light pink tones. The vampires loved her for all those lovely attributes. They were all foolishly drawn to her because of them. Awilda was her own secret weapon.

She loved her full breasts. She loved the weight of them in her hands. She was also quite fond of her derriere. It was round and plump. Whenever she couldn’t sleep she would lay on her side, close her eyes, and slowly breathe three deep breaths while she caressed all her curves. The sensation would always lull her into dreamtime. Awilda loved her body. She started to develop her shapely presence when she turned thirteen. That’s when she killed her second vampire.

Awilda2This short story from Amazon bestselling author Edward Medina was originally intended for an anthology submission. But Edward fell in love with Awilda, and decided to keep her all to himself. Now it’s time for him to share her with you.

The story of Awilda is an urban paranormal trip through the mind of a dedicated hunter. A hunter specifically designed to kill a very particular form of vampire. Believing it to be her mission since birth, Awilda puts a meticulously planned set of events in motion in order to eradicate the world of this infestation. Good girl by day, holy terror by night, Awilda is not the type of woman you’ll soon forget.

Awilda has charmed her way to number 2 on the Amazon bestseller list for Short Stories Horror and has earned 13 Amazon and Goodreads ★★★★★ reviews from readers, reviewers, authors, and bloggers. Awilda is available on Amazon and is intended for mature readers.

Alice Author PicAmazon bestselling author Edward Medina is a native New Yorker who was raised by his mother and grandmother to believe that life is an adventure best lived to the fullest. To that end he has lived his life on the edge of creative possibility.

Over time, Edward has been a radio and voice over artist. He built a significant career as a producer, director and writer for both digital media and the New York Off and Off – Off Broadway stages. He also had the honor and the privilege to work for the late great Jim Henson. He then went on to become a theme park designer. For fun, he became a steam train engineer and has been since childhood, a sometime magician. Although, at this point in his life, the magic he creates is more for the page as an author of high fantasy, dark horror, and epic steampunk adventures.

If you’d like more information on Edward’s work, visit his website, follow him on Twitter, like his page on Facebook, and subscribe to his blog on WordPress.

Edward Medina is proud to be a member of the Horror Writers Association and the Society of Children’s Book Writers & Illustrators.




Edward Medina Author

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It Is Said (MBKS 1)

It Is Said

A Murder of Crows

A Murder of Crows

Awilda

Awilda

The Corpse of Madeline Hill

The Corpse of Madeline Hill

Enter at Your Own Risk

Enter at Your Own Risk

Satan’s Toybox: Terrifying Teddies

Satan's Toybox: Terrifying Teddies

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